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Finishing ‘superhuman’ duties within the deadliest of situations, from deep mines to harmful volcanoes, it’s exhausting to imagine the employees in these stark photographs earn a pittance for placing their lives on the road.

Australian photographer Hugh Brown has travelled the globe to seize employees on the earth’s most excessive environment toiling for a wage as little as simply $1 a day.

As much as 30million folks worldwide are compelled to work in crippling situations – from deep inside underground mines, on the highest of mountains and alongside the aspect of sheer cliff-faces. 

A woman - an illegal coal scavenger - hauls a heavy block of coal out of an operating open-cut coal mine in eastern India.  She is a member of India's Adivasi indigenous people, working in Jharkhand

A woman - an illegal coal scavenger - hauls a heavy block of coal out of an operating open-cut coal mine in eastern India.  She is a member of India's Adivasi indigenous people, working in Jharkhand

A girl – an unlawful coal scavenger – hauls a heavy block of coal out of an working open-cut coal mine in jap India. She is a member of India’s Adivasi indigenous folks, working in Jharkhand

A miner chisels out chunks of sulphur as he readies his basket to carry out of the bowels of the Ijen volcano in East Java, Indonesia. Miners carry an average 154-pound (70kg) load about a mile up and out of the volcano and then about a further two miles down to a weigh station.  Each miner undertakes an average of two such loads per day and receives payment of around US$0.09 per kilogramme carried.  This miner can be seen chewing on his scarf to help prevent the ingress of sulphur dioxide and hydrogen sulphide into his body

A miner chisels out chunks of sulphur as he readies his basket to carry out of the bowels of the Ijen volcano in East Java, Indonesia. Miners carry an average 154-pound (70kg) load about a mile up and out of the volcano and then about a further two miles down to a weigh station.  Each miner undertakes an average of two such loads per day and receives payment of around US$0.09 per kilogramme carried.  This miner can be seen chewing on his scarf to help prevent the ingress of sulphur dioxide and hydrogen sulphide into his body

A miner chisels out chunks of sulphur as he readies his basket to hold out of the bowels of the Ijen volcano in East Java, Indonesia. Miners carry a median 154-pound (70kg) load a few mile up and out of the volcano after which a few additional two miles all the way down to a weigh station. Every miner undertakes a median of two such masses per day and receives fee of round US$0.09 per kilogramme carried. This miner could be seen chewing on his scarf to assist stop the ingress of sulphur dioxide and hydrogen sulphide into his physique

High up in northern Pakistan's Karakorum Range an illegal gem miner climbs up to his mine, located just short of 5,000 metres up the rocky incline

High up in northern Pakistan's Karakorum Range an illegal gem miner climbs up to his mine, located just short of 5,000 metres up the rocky incline

Excessive up in northern Pakistan’s Karakorum Vary an unlawful gem miner climbs as much as his mine, situated simply wanting 5,000 metres up the rocky incline

Photographed in Cameroon, 2017, this sand diver, Simon, was the strongest diver on this section of river.  A former boxer, he was a self-made man.  Working his way up to buy his first pirogue (narrow canoe made from a tree trunk), and then a second, a third and finally a fourth vessel, Simon said he harboured ambitions to move abroad and start a new life.  On average each diver retrieved around 1.7 tonnes of sand in a roughly three-hour-long shift. This is an incredible achievement given that each bucket held around 15 kilos of sand

Photographed in Cameroon, 2017, this sand diver, Simon, was the strongest diver on this section of river.  A former boxer, he was a self-made man.  Working his way up to buy his first pirogue (narrow canoe made from a tree trunk), and then a second, a third and finally a fourth vessel, Simon said he harboured ambitions to move abroad and start a new life.  On average each diver retrieved around 1.7 tonnes of sand in a roughly three-hour-long shift. This is an incredible achievement given that each bucket held around 15 kilos of sand

Photographed in Cameroon, 2017, this sand diver, Simon, was the strongest diver on this part of river. A former boxer, he was a self-made man. Working his approach as much as purchase his first pirogue (slender canoe comprised of a tree trunk), after which a second, a 3rd and at last a fourth vessel, Simon mentioned he harboured ambitions to maneuver overseas and begin a brand new life. On common every diver retrieved round 1.7 tonnes of sand in a roughly three-hour-long shift. That is an unbelievable achievement given that every bucket held round 15 kilos of sand

An artisanal gem miner works high in Northern Pakistan's Karakorum Range.  Because of the very high altitude - just short of 5,000 metres - the mining season lasts only three months, before and after which the risk of avalanche and rock falls become too great and access to water is all but eliminated due to a nearby spring freezing up

An artisanal gem miner works high in Northern Pakistan's Karakorum Range.  Because of the very high altitude - just short of 5,000 metres - the mining season lasts only three months, before and after which the risk of avalanche and rock falls become too great and access to water is all but eliminated due to a nearby spring freezing up

An artisanal gem miner works excessive in Northern Pakistan’s Karakorum Vary. Due to the very excessive altitude – simply wanting 5,000 metres – the mining season lasts solely three months, earlier than and after which the chance of avalanche and rock falls turn out to be too nice and entry to water is all however eradicated on account of a close-by spring freezing up

Photographer Hugh Brown has spent more than eight years uncovering those who are exposed to the harshest and most dangerous ways of making a living. Up to 30million people worldwide are forced to work in crippling conditions - from deep within underground mines, to the top of mountains. Above: these employees fill every possible space to go to work 

Photographer Hugh Brown has spent more than eight years uncovering those who are exposed to the harshest and most dangerous ways of making a living. Up to 30million people worldwide are forced to work in crippling conditions - from deep within underground mines, to the top of mountains. Above: these employees fill every possible space to go to work 

Photographer Hugh Brown has spent greater than eight years uncovering those that are uncovered to the harshest and most harmful methods of creating a residing. As much as 30million folks worldwide are compelled to work in crippling situations – from deep inside underground mines, to the highest of mountains. Above: these workers fill each attainable house to go to work 

A man dives for sand in the fast-moving Douala Estuary in eastern Cameroon. The work is brutal and dangerous, particularly when diving around low tide. Deaths occur periodically and some of the hazards include sand being swept into their ears and major orifices. Another potential danger is being knocked out while heading towards the hull of the boat when surfacing too quickly in the wrong place, and then drowning upon being washed away by the tide. Venomous snakes are known to come down on floating weed, and the estuary is also home to stingrays

A man dives for sand in the fast-moving Douala Estuary in eastern Cameroon. The work is brutal and dangerous, particularly when diving around low tide. Deaths occur periodically and some of the hazards include sand being swept into their ears and major orifices. Another potential danger is being knocked out while heading towards the hull of the boat when surfacing too quickly in the wrong place, and then drowning upon being washed away by the tide. Venomous snakes are known to come down on floating weed, and the estuary is also home to stingrays

A person dives for sand within the fast-moving Douala Estuary in jap Cameroon. The work is brutal and harmful, significantly when diving round low tide. Deaths happen periodically and a few of the hazards embody sand being swept into their ears and main orifices. One other potential hazard is being knocked out whereas heading in the direction of the hull of the boat when surfacing too shortly within the fallacious place, after which drowning upon being washed away by the tide. Venomous snakes are identified to return down on floating weed, and the estuary can be dwelling to stingrays

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A meat vendor brings goats to supply to the gem miners high in Pakistan's Karakorum Range. Because of the very high altitude - just short of 5,000 metres - all supplies and
equipment must be brought in from the villages and valley
below

A meat vendor brings goats to supply to the gem miners high in Pakistan's Karakorum Range. Because of the very high altitude - just short of 5,000 metres - all supplies and
equipment must be brought in from the villages and valley
below

A meat vendor brings goats to provide to the gem miners excessive in Pakistan’s Karakorum Vary. Due to the very excessive altitude – simply wanting 5,000 metres – all provides andequipment have to be introduced in from the villages and valleybelow

Brown has spent greater than eight years uncovering those that are uncovered to the harshest and most harmful methods of creating a residing. 

Travelling world wide, he visited workplaces within the likes of India, Pakistan and Bolivia in addition to Ghana, Mali and Senegal.

His dramatic pictures reveal these risking their lives to gather sources like coal, silver, gems, and copper, whereas enduring harsh working situations together with environmental degradation, folks trafficking, and organised crime.

Regardless of the extremely powerful conditions compelled upon them, Brown spoke about his shock at discovering that lots of the folks he photographed don’t think about themselves working in hardship.

‘The obvious brutality that we’re seeing the working situations of the miners creates a way of resilience and energy that I really feel we’re missing within the developed world,’ he mentioned. 

Cerro Rico, Bolivia, 2016: A percussion underground silver miner manually chisels out blast holes for the placement of dynamite deep in Cerro Rico's underground silver mines. In an eight-hour shift this miner will be lucky to chisel out between two-to-four 30 centimetre blast holes

Cerro Rico, Bolivia, 2016: A percussion underground silver miner manually chisels out blast holes for the placement of dynamite deep in Cerro Rico's underground silver mines. In an eight-hour shift this miner will be lucky to chisel out between two-to-four 30 centimetre blast holes

Cerro Rico, Bolivia, 2016: A percussion underground silver miner manually chisels out blast holes for the position of dynamite deep in Cerro Rico’s underground silver mines. In an eight-hour shift this miner will likely be fortunate to chisel out between two-to-four 30 centimetre blast holes

Above: A miners' grave yard in Cerro Rico, Bolivia, 2016. Photographer Hugh Brown's images have now been documented in a thought-provoking project named 'The Cruellest Earth', and will also be turned into a photographic art book

Above: A miners' grave yard in Cerro Rico, Bolivia, 2016. Photographer Hugh Brown's images have now been documented in a thought-provoking project named 'The Cruellest Earth', and will also be turned into a photographic art book

Above: A miners’ grave yard in Cerro Rico, Bolivia, 2016. Photographer Hugh Brown’s photographs have now been documented in a thought-provoking venture named ‘The Cruellest Earth’, and also will be was a photographic artwork ebook

Sulphur miners haul sulphur up an arduous path out of Indonesia's Ijen volcano. Australian photographer Hugh Brown said: 'The story of these people - some of the poorest and hardest-working on the planet - needs to be told'

Sulphur miners haul sulphur up an arduous path out of Indonesia's Ijen volcano. Australian photographer Hugh Brown said: 'The story of these people - some of the poorest and hardest-working on the planet - needs to be told'

Sulphur miners haul sulphur up an arduous path out of Indonesia’s Ijen volcano. Australian photographer Hugh Brown mentioned: ‘The story of those folks – a few of the poorest and hardest-working on the planet – must be informed’

Miner in Burkina Faso 2010: Weathered by years of hard work the man pictured above is in reality 'no different to the people of the world's major cities', according to the photographer.  He had sacrificed working in the villages and fields for the prospect of a better life. Earning money in the mines can be infinitely better when compared to other vocations if one strikes it rich.  But as the hours are long and the work is dangerous, many people die

Miner in Burkina Faso 2010: Weathered by years of hard work the man pictured above is in reality 'no different to the people of the world's major cities', according to the photographer.  He had sacrificed working in the villages and fields for the prospect of a better life. Earning money in the mines can be infinitely better when compared to other vocations if one strikes it rich.  But as the hours are long and the work is dangerous, many people die

Miner in Burkina Faso 2010: Weathered by years of exhausting work the person pictured above is in actuality ‘no totally different to the folks of the world’s main cities’, based on the photographer. He had sacrificed working within the villages and fields for the prospect of a greater life. Incomes cash within the mines could be infinitely higher when in comparison with different vocations if one strikes it wealthy. However because the hours are lengthy and the work is harmful, many individuals die

At first glance, it may look like this worker is holding a gun, but this underground gem miner is in fact working with a rock drill high in Northern Pakistan's Karakorum Range. While mines were technically supposed to be around three feet apart, these separations have been reduced in recent years creating a significant rock fall and blasting hazard for those working close to the faces of their mines

At first glance, it may look like this worker is holding a gun, but this underground gem miner is in fact working with a rock drill high in Northern Pakistan's Karakorum Range. While mines were technically supposed to be around three feet apart, these separations have been reduced in recent years creating a significant rock fall and blasting hazard for those working close to the faces of their mines

At first look, it might appear to be this employee is holding a gun, however this underground gem miner is in reality working with a rock drill excessive in Northern Pakistan’s Karakorum Vary. Whereas mines had been technically presupposed to be round three toes aside, these separations have been diminished lately creating a major rock fall and blasting hazard for these working near the faces of their mines

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Hugh Brown (right) with his expedition team during his first trek into Pakistan's Karakorum Range, 2015. He has travelled the globe to capture people working in the world's most extreme conditions

Hugh Brown (right) with his expedition team during his first trek into Pakistan's Karakorum Range, 2015. He has travelled the globe to capture people working in the world's most extreme conditions

Hugh Brown (proper) along with his expedition workforce throughout his first trek into Pakistan’s Karakorum Vary, 2015. He has travelled the globe to seize folks working on the earth’s most excessive situations

Particles of sulphur adorn the eyes and face of this sulphur miner, who was photographed working at Ijen volcano, Indonesia, in 2012.  Photographer Hugh Brown said: 'When people see the images, often their reactions are ones of shock and horror that people can be living and working in these conditions, in the 21st century. Many want to bring an end to the activities they are seeing. Most don't realise that their own bubbles of privilege are not the norm'

Particles of sulphur adorn the eyes and face of this sulphur miner, who was photographed working at Ijen volcano, Indonesia, in 2012.  Photographer Hugh Brown said: 'When people see the images, often their reactions are ones of shock and horror that people can be living and working in these conditions, in the 21st century. Many want to bring an end to the activities they are seeing. Most don't realise that their own bubbles of privilege are not the norm'

Particles of sulphur adorn the eyes and face of this sulphur miner, who was photographed working at Ijen volcano, Indonesia, in 2012. Photographer Hugh Brown mentioned: ‘When folks see the photographs, usually their reactions are ones of shock and horror that individuals could be residing and dealing in these situations, within the 21st century. Many need to deliver an finish to the actions they’re seeing. Most do not realise that their very own bubbles of privilege should not the norm’

A sulphur miner in Indonesia's Ijen volcano gasps in pain in air thick with sulphur dioxide and hydrogen sulphide.  When the sulphur from these gases mixes with the moisture in one's eyes, lungs and throat it creates sulphuric acid, hence the screaming in pain

A sulphur miner in Indonesia's Ijen volcano gasps in pain in air thick with sulphur dioxide and hydrogen sulphide.  When the sulphur from these gases mixes with the moisture in one's eyes, lungs and throat it creates sulphuric acid, hence the screaming in pain

A sulphur miner in Indonesia’s Ijen volcano gasps in ache in air thick with sulphur dioxide and hydrogen sulphide. When the sulphur from these gases mixes with the moisture in a single’s eyes, lungs and throat it creates sulphuric acid, therefore the screaming in ache

Bojharis carry coal chiselled out by coal cutters in an illegal underground coal mine in eastern India.  Average loads carried by these bojharis was around about 88 pounds (40kg) at a time.  In this mine, the workers had sought the input of a mining engineer to choose the placement of pillars, to help minimise the risk of collapses

Bojharis carry coal chiselled out by coal cutters in an illegal underground coal mine in eastern India.  Average loads carried by these bojharis was around about 88 pounds (40kg) at a time.  In this mine, the workers had sought the input of a mining engineer to choose the placement of pillars, to help minimise the risk of collapses

Bojharis carry coal chiselled out by coal cutters in an unlawful underground coal mine in jap India. Common masses carried by these bojharis was round about 88 kilos (40kg) at a time. On this mine, the employees had sought the enter of a mining engineer to decide on the position of pillars, to assist minimise the chance of collapses

This artisanal gold site in Burkina Faso in west Africa was home to some 10,000 people.  And while these locations can be home to some of the more difficult aspects of humanity (extremism, organised crime, environmental degradation and slavery) they also provide unique upward mobility pathways for people to move from extreme poverty and into more skilled vocations such as those we are used to in the developed world

This artisanal gold site in Burkina Faso in west Africa was home to some 10,000 people.  And while these locations can be home to some of the more difficult aspects of humanity (extremism, organised crime, environmental degradation and slavery) they also provide unique upward mobility pathways for people to move from extreme poverty and into more skilled vocations such as those we are used to in the developed world

This artisanal gold web site in Burkina Faso in west Africa was dwelling to some 10,000 folks. And whereas these areas could be dwelling to a few of the tougher facets of humanity (extremism, organised crime, environmental degradation and slavery) in addition they present distinctive upward mobility pathways for folks to maneuver from excessive poverty and into extra expert vocations akin to these we’re used to within the developed world

An illegal underground coal miner, pictured in eastern India, 2013. Photographer Hugh Brown said: 'Many feel a sense of sadness for the people in my photographers. But in my mind they are not to be pitied. Yes, they are living lives of hardship but so too are the people of the cities of the developed world. Just in a different way'

An illegal underground coal miner, pictured in eastern India, 2013. Photographer Hugh Brown said: 'Many feel a sense of sadness for the people in my photographers. But in my mind they are not to be pitied. Yes, they are living lives of hardship but so too are the people of the cities of the developed world. Just in a different way'

An unlawful underground coal miner, pictured in jap India, 2013. Photographer Hugh Brown mentioned: ‘Many really feel a way of unhappiness for the folks in my photographers. However in my thoughts they don’t seem to be to be pitied. Sure, they’re residing lives of hardship however so too are the folks of the cities of the developed world. Simply differently’

Above: A stone miner works on the banks of the Fleuve Congo in the Republic of Congo, in 2010. Brown said: 'Many of us in the developed world equate comfort, security and safety with better. I'm not sure that's right'

Above: A stone miner works on the banks of the Fleuve Congo in the Republic of Congo, in 2010. Brown said: 'Many of us in the developed world equate comfort, security and safety with better. I'm not sure that's right'

Above: A stone miner works on the banks of the Fleuve Congo within the Republic of Congo, in 2010. Brown mentioned: ‘Many people within the developed world equate consolation, safety and security with higher. I am undecided that is proper’

At the Ijen volcano in Indonesia, ceramic pipes tap into an active volcanic vent.  The sulphur rich gases come out of the vent from a magma chamber over 12 miles (20km) below the surface and cool when they hit the pipes causing them to condense into a liquid and then solidify.  At the time of reaching the surface the gases can be as hot as 1,112F (600C)

At the Ijen volcano in Indonesia, ceramic pipes tap into an active volcanic vent.  The sulphur rich gases come out of the vent from a magma chamber over 12 miles (20km) below the surface and cool when they hit the pipes causing them to condense into a liquid and then solidify.  At the time of reaching the surface the gases can be as hot as 1,112F (600C)

On the Ijen volcano in Indonesia, ceramic pipes faucet into an lively volcanic vent. The sulphur wealthy gases come out of the vent from a magma chamber over 12 miles (20km) under the floor and funky once they hit the pipes inflicting them to condense right into a liquid after which solidify. On the time of reaching the floor the gases could be as scorching as 1,112F (600C)

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An illegal coal scavenger retrieves a large block of coal from a working open-cut coal mine in Jharkhand, eastern India.  The climb out of the mine is treacherous with a precipitous drop down one side likely to lead to death

An illegal coal scavenger retrieves a large block of coal from a working open-cut coal mine in Jharkhand, eastern India.  The climb out of the mine is treacherous with a precipitous drop down one side likely to lead to death

An unlawful coal scavenger retrieves a big block of coal from a working open-cut coal mine in Jharkhand, jap India. The climb out of the mine is treacherous with a precipitous drop down one aspect more likely to result in demise

Gem miners relax at the end of the day in Northern Pakistan's Karakorum Range.  At this location miners lived in stone huts for the duration of their three month mining season.   Photographer Hugh Brown first took up his project in 2010 when he quickly had to adapt his photography skills to suit the harsh environments he wanted to capture. He said: 'For many years I focused on taking the most beautiful images that I could. Then I found myself starting to feel unfulfilled. I wanted to do something meaningful with my life, to feel I had made a contribution when my time comes to leave this earth'

Gem miners relax at the end of the day in Northern Pakistan's Karakorum Range.  At this location miners lived in stone huts for the duration of their three month mining season.   Photographer Hugh Brown first took up his project in 2010 when he quickly had to adapt his photography skills to suit the harsh environments he wanted to capture. He said: 'For many years I focused on taking the most beautiful images that I could. Then I found myself starting to feel unfulfilled. I wanted to do something meaningful with my life, to feel I had made a contribution when my time comes to leave this earth'

Gem miners loosen up on the finish of the day in Northern Pakistan’s Karakorum Vary. At this location miners lived in stone huts during their three month mining season. Photographer Hugh Brown first took up his venture in 2010 when he shortly needed to adapt his pictures abilities to go well with the cruel environments he wished to seize. He mentioned: ‘For a few years I targeted on taking probably the most lovely photographs that I might. Then I discovered myself beginning to really feel unfulfilled. I wished to do one thing significant with my life, to really feel I had made a contribution when my time comes to go away this earth’

Illegal coal scavengers descend into a working open-cut coal mine in eastern India.  For an hour each morning in between shift change when the large-scale earthmoving equipment stops working these illegal coal scavengers work rapidly to retrieve as many large blocks as they can in Jharkhand

Illegal coal scavengers descend into a working open-cut coal mine in eastern India.  For an hour each morning in between shift change when the large-scale earthmoving equipment stops working these illegal coal scavengers work rapidly to retrieve as many large blocks as they can in Jharkhand

Unlawful coal scavengers descend right into a working open-cut coal mine in jap India. For an hour every morning in between shift change when the large-scale earthmoving gear stops working these unlawful coal scavengers work quickly to retrieve as many massive blocks as they’ll in Jharkhand

A sand diver, pictured in Cameroon, 2017. These men dive for sand in the fast-moving Douala Estuary in eastern Cameroon. Hugh Brown said that when taking such photos, he had put his own life on the line to get the best shots - scaling the sides of active volcanoes and balancing on rock faces thousands of feet from the ground

A sand diver, pictured in Cameroon, 2017. These men dive for sand in the fast-moving Douala Estuary in eastern Cameroon. Hugh Brown said that when taking such photos, he had put his own life on the line to get the best shots - scaling the sides of active volcanoes and balancing on rock faces thousands of feet from the ground

A sand diver, pictured in Cameroon, 2017. These males dive for sand within the fast-moving Douala Estuary in jap Cameroon. Hugh Brown mentioned that when taking such photographs, he had put his personal life on the road to get the very best photographs – scaling the edges of lively volcanoes and balancing on rock faces hundreds of toes from the bottom

Above: Snapped in Cameroon is this sand diver, putting his life on the line in a fast-moving tidal estuary known for dangers including venomous snakes. Photographer Hugh Brown said: 'We are all a product of our environment and we all do what we need to survive. And that is the same everywhere. Human brings in the developed world haven't lost the capability of doing superhuman things. They've just lost the need'

Above: Snapped in Cameroon is this sand diver, putting his life on the line in a fast-moving tidal estuary known for dangers including venomous snakes. Photographer Hugh Brown said: 'We are all a product of our environment and we all do what we need to survive. And that is the same everywhere. Human brings in the developed world haven't lost the capability of doing superhuman things. They've just lost the need'

Above: Snapped in Cameroon is that this sand diver, placing his life on the road in a fast-moving tidal estuary identified for risks together with venomous snakes. Photographer Hugh Brown mentioned: ‘We’re all a product of the environment and all of us do what we have to survive. And that’s the similar in all places. Human brings within the developed world have not misplaced the potential of doing superhuman issues. They’ve simply misplaced the necessity’

At the base of Cerro Rico was the ancient city of Potosi, one of the highest cities in the world.  Potosi sits at an altitude of 4,100 metres while Cerro Rico has an official height of almost 4,800 metres

At the base of Cerro Rico was the ancient city of Potosi, one of the highest cities in the world.  Potosi sits at an altitude of 4,100 metres while Cerro Rico has an official height of almost 4,800 metres

On the base of Cerro Rico was the traditional metropolis of Potosi, one of many highest cities on the earth. Potosi sits at an altitude of 4,100 metres whereas Cerro Rico has an official peak of virtually 4,800 metres

In Cerro Rico, Bolivia, 2016: With bloodshot eyes and caked face, this underground silver miner pauses momentarily while at work to have his image captured

In Cerro Rico, Bolivia, 2016: With bloodshot eyes and caked face, this underground silver miner pauses momentarily while at work to have his image captured

In Cerro Rico, Bolivia, 2016: With bloodshot eyes and caked face, this underground silver miner pauses momentarily whereas at work to have his picture captured

Miners move an ore wagon of silver deep inside Bolivia's Cerro Rico silver mines.  The work here is incredibly dangerous.  And even today deaths are common. Brown said: 'Death is one of the less pleasant realities of life spent working in these environments and these are not places to be if you have issues with your own mortality'

Miners move an ore wagon of silver deep inside Bolivia's Cerro Rico silver mines.  The work here is incredibly dangerous.  And even today deaths are common. Brown said: 'Death is one of the less pleasant realities of life spent working in these environments and these are not places to be if you have issues with your own mortality'

Miners transfer an ore wagon of silver deep inside Bolivia’s Cerro Rico silver mines. The work right here is extremely harmful. And even in the present day deaths are frequent. Brown mentioned: ‘Dying is without doubt one of the much less nice realities of life spent working in these environments and these should not locations to be when you’ve got points with your personal mortality’

Australian photographer Hugh Brown in Pakistan. His images have now been documented in a thought-provoking project named 'The Cruellest Earth', and will also be turned into a photographic art book

Australian photographer Hugh Brown in Pakistan. His images have now been documented in a thought-provoking project named 'The Cruellest Earth', and will also be turned into a photographic art book

Australian photographer Hugh Brown in Pakistan. His photographs have now been documented in a thought-provoking venture named ‘The Cruellest Earth’, and also will be was a photographic artwork ebook

 

 

    

  

 



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